Update from the Occupation – June 21, 2017

Occupation Day 19

I spent about ten hours at the site today but I’m too beat to write about it! Sorry!

Please refer to team members for questions about specific projects.

Thanks to the fact sheet team for getting the new revised edition up and running.

In solidarity,

Laura

TEAMS:

  • HANDOUT/edits: Art, Andy, Kelli
  • TALKING POINTS: Kelli, Amanda, Kim
  • CDT AD: Kelli
  • DEP PERMIT REVOCATION: Sara, Andy, Dave S., Katherine, Mark H.
  • LETTER TO PSU ALUM DEP ADMIN HEADS: Laura, integrating David H. BOT letter language.
  • SITE AND SUPPLY: Janet E., Dave S., Kelli
  • Letters to the Editor: Erin, Irmi, Don, Bernie, Ingrid
  • BIKE TOUR: VOLUNTEER FOUND!!! Kim thinks she may have found a point to lead the effort! Kim will liaison.

ACTION: PLEASE SIGN UP FOR SHIFTS ON GOOGLE CALENDAR!

(Please let Joe (jpcusumano@gmail.com) know if you would like to be added to the calendar to sign up to spend time at the site)

ACTION: I created a FB check in. It’s called Nittany Valley Water Coalition Encampment. Please check in at the site regularly. Both virtually and in real life!!

Wish List:

  • Dry erase board

Reminders….

Please use your contacts to reach out to property owners in very visible locations to display No Toll signs.

If you haven’t yet, please sign the new petition, Demand that Penn State Acts as a Responsible Steward to Our Community’s Water

Pass it on please!

Staying Informed and In Touch

Like and Follow us on Facebook:

Nittany Valley Water Coalition Website

Bailiwick News – Compiled 10-part series.

David Hughes Letter to Eric Barron – June 22, 2017

Dear Eric,

I hope you are well. As you know I have taken a keen interest in the Toll Brothers site on Whitehall Road. I addressed the Board on this issue on May 6, 2016 during public hour (1).

I am writing to you today and cc’ing the Board and a number of others in leadership whom I have talked to in the last three weeks so that I might stress that going ahead with this development places the University at risk.  I have been examining the available science (discussed below) and it all points to a fragile ecological area with connections to the well water.

I presented my assessment of the studies that have been done to the State College Borough Water Authority Board (SCBWA) last Thursday (6/15/17) and simply raised a number of concerns I had. Based on those concerns the SCBWA added new items to their Board meeting and agreed to look into conducting new studies on the Toll Brothers development site. In particular, a feasibility evaluation for doing a Dye Tracer Study was proposed and approved that would shed light on the statement by their current board member, and Penn State Extension Officer, Dave Yoxtheimer.

“The results of the dye tracing [on Slab Cabin run] provided independent evidence of the importance of subsurface flows in the transmission of water beneath the surface channel of Slab Cabin Run. This information lead to the conclusion that, in practical effect, there are two Slab Cabin Runs, one in the visible surface channel and another hidden from view in the shallow subsurface“ (2).

The movement by SCWBA is a clear indicator that the available science does highlight potential issues of risk with situating this large development so close to the well heads. This important move by SCWBA was noted at the Ferguson Township Board of Supervisors regular meeting on 6/19/17.

Let me repeat briefly the evidence I have reviewed that suggests future negative impacts on the two major wells. This is not my area of expertise so it is entirely possible I am mistaken so I have limited myself to the presentation of facts and direct quotes from the > 1,000 pages of reports and appendices. This is just an informational exchange to raise my concerns with you and the Board about possible risk.

The Toll Brothers site is in Zone 2 of two wells (Thomas and Harter Wellfields). These two wellfields provide >65% of the water for State College each day. The aforementioned tracer studies (November 2005 and December 2006, Ref 3) showed that a tracer dye (Sulphorhodamine B) released into Slab Cabin run upstream of well 11 (Thomas Wellfield) and 25  (Harter Wellfield) entered the wells in 5 days. Concentrations were different with higher levels in well 25 compared to Well 11 (82 ppb/day vs 1 ppb/day), implying different degrees of connection. Another dye (Fluorescein) released in a dry tributary (Musser Gap) feeding into Slab Cabin showed the dye arrived in Wells 11 and 25 between days 20 and 28 at similar concentrations (0.76 ppb/day and 0.56 ppb/day). Interestingly the dye was detected in Slab Cabin Run after 13 days at a concentration of 1 ppb/day. This according to the author of the report (Dave Yoxtheimer, Ref  2, Ref 3) highlights a complex subsurface flow captured in the above quote.

As a geologist you know that the reason for such interconnectedness is the karst and epikarst nature of the dolomite bedrock in our valley. Although this topography is well known, a repeated counter argument I have heard was that it is not a cause for concern as there is plenty of soil that would filter out any contaminants long before it reaches the wells.

To assess this, CMT Labs did the infiltration studies on the Toll Brothers site (Ref 4, Ref 5). These are discussed in the June 5, 2015 Final Stormwater Report (6). The site is dolomite rock with very shallow Hagerstown and Opequon soils. The 5.5 acres proposed to house the stormwater detention basin is on top of an exciting swale over a fracture zone. The area has extensive sinkholes. In preparing two reports on the infiltration studies CMT Labs had to do conventional and non-conventional infiltration tests because the soil was so shallow. It was necessary to also explore the capacity of the bedrock, which is very close to the surface and consists of fully exposed rock in some areas. The subsoils have “excellent structure/macropore abundance” but their “close proximity..to permeable bedrock” (Ref 4, p. 982) means the soil may not function as the filters such a site requires. That is, the stormwater may pass through the shallow soils into the sub-surface. As outlined above, the existance of a subsurface Slab Cabin Run connected to the wells means any pollutants from the site would also travel into the wells.

The two CMT reports are not confident in their assessment of the safety of this site and while they did not undertake a formal risk analysis, it is interesting how the report in 2013 (Ref 4) shifted from a safety recommendation of 2.0-2.5 to 3.0 in 2014 (Ref 5)

The reports raised a red flag about compaction. As you know (but perhaps the others cc’d here do not) the ability of soil to filter pollutants rests on the amount of natural holes it contains.  Applying pressure to soil results in compaction which reduces its ability to act as a filter. In the first report, CMT Labs advocated that heavy equipment not be used during and after construction of the storm water capture basin. “All heavy equipment should be prohibited from operating or travelling over the infiltration pit” (Ref 4, p. 983)

Both reports (Ref 4, p. 984, Ref 5, p. 1041) expressed concern regarding the amount of mowing because of the compaction that could occur. Correct planting is needed but the timing of that and the first water to pond in the basin was a concern raised in the second report since there could be a “development of a restrictive layer” reducing infiltration capacity (Ref 5, p. 1041).

Taken together the soil analysis highlights a narrow layer, close to the bedrock that is liable to lose its filtration capacity, implying it is perhaps not the ideal location for a basin.

Soil is a natural filter and we can certainly use artificial filters if the soil is not sufficient. Engineering solutions such as a separation filtration are possible but the issue is that these “are prone to clogging over time, and may require long term maintenance.  These issues should be discussed with appropriate municipal officials” (Ref 4, p. 982).

I have seen no plans for such maintenance or had evidence that these discussions with Ferguson Township occurred.

So far I have discussed the highly connected nature of the water and the insecurity expressed on the role that the shallow soils at the site can play in filtering the pollutants.

A major issue of course is that a sinkhole opens.

The CMT report states that the karst rock and its permeable bedrock mean “significant subsidence and sinkhole activity could occur” (Ref 4, p. 982).

Farming is the historic land use and it

“does not significantly increase the potential for sinkholes to form on this tract. The significant grading, landscape alteration, increase in impervious surfaces, and channeling of stormwater involved with this project [Cottages] does increase the risk of sinkhole formation and therefore does increase the potential to degrade ground water quality.October 31, 2014 letter from Aqualith Technologies, LLC, (Author: David Yoxtheimer, now Penn State Extension).

A sinkhole represents a direct conduit in to the aquifer which in turn could have direct adverse impacts on regional drinking water quality if significant volumes of surface runoff are channeled into a sinkhole. Based on the recent site walkover with the project engineers on October 23, 2014, and the site inspection by PA-DEP personnel (Kipp Starks, December 3, 2013) there are sinkholes in proximity to the project and therefore they do represent a risk. (October 31, 2014 letter from Aqualith Technologies, LLC, (Author: David Yoxtheimer, now Penn State Extension).

The 2014 CMT Lab report states:

In terms of risk management, we do not believe there is an effective method for elimination of sinkholes in karst infiltration areas…and the risk is inherent” (Ref 5, p. 1034)

With such a large impervious surface planned at this site there exists the potential for marked changes in the pH to more acidic water in the runoff, accelerating erosion of the dolomite rock leading to sinkholes. I am certainly happy to provide references to other case studies where sinkholes formed under basins.

I am neither a hydrogeologist nor a geologist. I am an ecologist. But my reading of the available reports leads me to conclude that we do not have sufficient evidence to state that the placement of this development so close to the major wells is not without risk. The question for us, Penn State, is how much risk are we willing to accept?

My interest is protecting the mission of our University and the noble aims laid out in our strategic plan to be good stewards.

You may have heard that the Supreme Court of PA recently established (June 20) a broad interpretation of the Environmental Rights Amendment (Article 1, section 27) to the State Constitution, cementing in place the Commonwealth’s role as trustees for public natural resources. The Constitutional amendment states:

Pennsylvania’s public natural resources are the common property of all the people, including generations yet to come. As trustee of these resources, the Commonwealth shall conserve and maintain them for the benefit of all the people. The people have a right to clean air, pure water, and to the preservation of the natural, scenic, historic and esthetic values of the environment.

This Supreme Court of PA ruling sets aside 40 years of more restrictive interpretations. This is important here because the water in these wells is a common resource. We, as a Land Grant, have embraced the Environmental Rights Amendment, which we quote in our strategic plan.

I would also draw your attention the Community Bill of Rights adopted by Ferguson Township which states:

“Right to Pure Water. All residents, natural communities and ecosystems in Ferguson Township possess a fundamental and inalienable right to sustainably access, use, consume, and preserve water drawn from natural water cycles that provide pure water necessary to sustain life within the Township.” Section 1.05

Finally, were Toll Brothers plan to be put forward today it would not be compliant with the current stormwater management plan. I have heard the argument that their plan went above and beyond what was required and thus is safe.  I have seen no evidence of this and would point out that if they submitted the same plan today it would not be compliant with regulations in place to protect water.

I do not know if we (Penn State) can reasonably state that in selling this land we have no responsibility should the wells get contaminated. But perhaps it is best to observe the precautionary principle and find an alternative solution.

Last Saturday I drove around for 3 hours with a local developer and it is clear there are many sites near the University which we could sell to Toll Brothers. I am happy to provide maps highlighting where these are.

In conclusion, it is my view that proceeding with the sale to Toll Brothers represents a risk to the University. This is certainly in terms of our reputation in this community but may be a broader risk as we are the State’s Land Grant and have responsibility to be stewards of our natural resources.

I am happy to serve you or the Board in any way I can as we navigate this issue.

Sincerely

David Hughes

Interview on 98.7 The Freq

Listen to Jason Crane’s interview of Kelli Hoover and David Hughes about the Toll Brothers project!
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Update from the Occupation – Tuesday, June 20

Summer Solstice.

Occupation Day 18

Happy Solstice! I must say dinner with friends at an occupation site is a first for me in terms of celebrating the Solstice. It seemed quite fitting.

Weather permitting and pending arrival of exterior paint we will finish painting signs tomorrow (Wednesday).

Thought I’d share tonight’s Save Our State College Water Supply Facebook post:

Tonight we again discussed how the Toll Brothers said they would come to the table and Penn State remains silent. We are……waiting at the community table. Please join us PSU. We know you can do it. Just believe. Think of what opportunity lies here. Let’s repair the damage done by evolving into the institution SO MANY PEOPLE know we can be. The occupation is full of alums. We are….setting the table for you.”

We need some occupier training materials! Does anyone have a list of talking points started? Please send them to me (Laura).

Thanks to Kim for recruiting some heavy hitters.

Thanks to the fact sheet team for moving that along. We may see the revised edition on site tomorrow!!

Thanks to the CDT ad team. It’s progressing.

Thanks to everyone. You are making it all happen.

In solidarity,

Laura

TEAMS:

HANDOUT/edits: David H., Art, Andy M., Kelli

DEP PERMIT REVOCATION: Sara, Andy, Dave S., Katherine

LETTER TO PSU ALUM, DEP ADMIN HEADS: Laura, integrating David H. Board of Trustees letter language.

SITE AND SUPPLY: Janet E., Dave S., Laura, Kelli

Letters to the Editor: Erin, Irmi, Don, Bernie, Ingrid

BIKE TOUR: VOLUNTEER FOUND!!! Kim thinks she may have found a point to lead the effort! Kim will liaison between her and our group. It is a touching show of community support. More soon and THANK YOU KIM!!

ACTION: PLEASE SIGN UP FOR SHIFTS ON GOOGLE CALENDAR!  (Please let Joe (jpcusumano@gmail.com) know if you would like to be added to the calendar to sign up to spend time at the site)

ACTION: I created a FB check in. It’s called Nittany Valley Water Coalition Encampment. Please check in at the site regularly. Both virtually and in real life!!

Lost and Found (Contact Laura to claim):

  • Gray sweatshirt
  • Three blue mugs
  • Three umbrellas: Red, green, black w white polka dots
  • Green hat

Wish List:

  • Exterior paint to finish the signs- we don’t need more than a gallon.
  • Dry erase board

Reminders….

Please use your contacts to reach out to property owners in very visible locations to display No Toll signs.

If you haven’t yet, please sign the new petition, Demand that Penn State Acts as a Responsible Steward to Our Community’s Water

Pass it on please!

Staying Informed and In Touch

Like and Follow us on Facebook:

“Check in” to Nittany Valley Water Coalition Encampment

Nittany Valley Water Coalition Website

Bailiwick News – Slab Cabin Run series

Update from the Occupation – Monday, June 19

Occupation day 17

I only spent about a half hour at the site today and I missed being there, outside gazing at the mountains, while I sat in my meeting tonight.

I’m glad I can spend a big chunk of time there tomorrow.

I love that Kim thought to mention in an email to me that “Maria brought red raspberries!”

I love that the few minutes I was able to be there, Jonathan’s guitar playing filled the night air in such a lovely way. Such awesome people live here!!

Weather permitting: Tomorrow-Tuesday- at 10 stop by the site to help Bruce use white paint to put base coat on the wood signs. Bring paint if you have it. We need to move on the signs when the weather allows!

For dinner Pam is bringing salad with five organic lettuces and spinach, spring onions and basil from her garden with garnishes as each chooses – blue cheese, org. walnuts, apples, raisins, grated carrot. And org oil & vinegar as a dressing (self applied) with organic sour dough bread from Weg’s to go with.

Wow!

Annnnnd Jane is bringing either shepherd’s pie or polenta with mushrooms, tomato, cheese, and black beans ( both vegetarian).

YUM!

We need some occupier training materials. Does anyone have a list of talking points started? Please send them to me (Laura).

Also, let’s start thinking about building a super simple kitchen counter out of wood for a dishwashing station.

In solidarity,

Laura

TEAMS:

Letters to the Editor: Erin, Irmi, Don, Bernie, Ingrid

BIKE TOUR:

HANDOUT/edits: David H., Art

SITE AND SUPPLY: Janet, David S., Laura, Kelli

VOLUNTEER NEEDED: Folks are signing up to work on the watershed bike tour, and we need a point person to volunteer to lead the effort!

ACTION: I created a FB check in. It’s called Nittany Valley Water Coalition Encampment. Please check in at the site regularly. Both virtually and in real life!!

ACTION: PLEASE SIGN UP FOR SHIFTS ON GOOGLE CALENDAR!  (Please let Joe (jpcusumano@gmail.com) know if you would like to be added to the calendar to sign up to spend time at the site)

Wish List:

  • Dry erase board
  • Another large storage bin please!

Lost and found:

  • Three blue mugs
  • Polka dot umbrella

Reminders….

Please use your contacts to reach out to property owners in very visible locations to display No Toll signs.

If you haven’t yet, please sign the new petition, Demand that Penn State Acts as a Responsible Steward to Our Community’s Water

Pass it on please!

Staying Informed and In Touch

Like and Follow us on Facebook:

“Check in” to Nittany Valley Water Coalition Encampment

Nittany Valley Water Coalition Website

Bailiwick News – Slab Cabin Run series

Update from the Occupation – Sunday, June 18

Occupation Day 16

Camp seemed in much better shape to face the rain today. Thanks so much for the storage bins!

Despite the drizzle, or perhaps because of it, we had a lovely dinner. There was a rainbow again and Dorothy brought delicious daal and rice.

Jessica brought bananas and watermelon to share. And gifted camp a large cooler!

There has been a call for workers to help with lawn care and the sign move tomorrow at 10 am. Kelli is leading that effort, with the support of her husband, Steve. (FYI, the long measuring tape was in the tool box when I left today!)

I’ll be off site all day tomorrow. Please sign up for shifts!

In solidarity,

Laura

VOLUNTEER NEEDED: Folks are signing up to work on the watershed bike tour, and we need a point person to volunteer to lead the effort!

ACTION: I created a Facebook check in. It’s called Nittany Valley Water Coalition Encampment. Please check in at the site regularly. Both virtually and in real life!!

ACTION: PLEASE SIGN UP FOR SHIFTS ON GOOGLE CALENDAR!  (Please let Joe (jpcusumano@gmail.com) know if you would like to be added to the calendar to sign up to spend time at the site)

Supplies needed:

  • Neosporin
  • One shallow, but large storage bin for coffee mugs and some plates.
  • Tools needed: Claw hammer, Pry bar, Grass whip

Lost and found:

  • Three blue mugs
  • Polka dot umbrella

Reminders….

Please use your contacts to reach out to property owners in very visible locations to display No Toll signs.

If you haven’t yet, please sign the new petition, Demand that Penn State Acts as a Responsible Steward to Our Community’s Water

Pass it on please!

Staying Informed and In Touch

Like and Follow us on Facebook:

“Check in” to Nittany Valley Water Coalition Encampment

Nittany Valley Water Coalition Website

Bailiwick News – Slab Cabin Run series

Update from the Occupation – Saturday, June 17

Occupation Day 15.

When I arrived at camp today at 1:30, to my complete amazement there was an entire bucket of super fine tent stakes (along with a good supply of strong cord). Thank you Bill. The stakes are beautiful. Seriously, these are the most beautiful tent stakes I’ve ever seen. And their design to spec form just nails it. If anything will help weather the upcoming storms, it is these stakes.

Jim and Jean came by to bring us guac and chips and invited us to speak briefly at their neighborhood association picnic tomorrow. David H. will attend and bring signs and some literature.

Dee and Bruce hooked us up with storage bins!

Many people stopped by, got signs, signed the petition and gave contributions. I have about five or six new recruits. Who gets their forms to enter into the database? One is interested in letters to the editor, two in occupation.

Ed and Tina stopped by in the afternoon and really helped us finalize the reorgainization of the common space. THANK YOU!

All: Please try to read bin labels and return items to their bin of origin when you use things. Also, coolers are now labeled either FOOD ONLY or DRINKS ONLY. PLEASE do not put food in the “DRINKS ONLY” cooler. It explodes or sinks in the melted ice and it makes a disgusting mess. THANK YOU for your help with this.

Dinner was served by Don, straight from Foxdale fridges (thanks!).  Then was followed up by a delivery of two pizzas and some soda from an unnamed supporter.

This evening, while clearing the easement for sign visibility, David H. broke Kim’s lawnmower (!) on a big metal utility covering lid thing and Alba and he jetted out to get the fix underway.

If the weather is nice tomorrow afternoon (Sunday) and folks are willing and able to help, please bring your gas mowers and weed whackers and do some clearing for the sign move. Warning: Don’t hit the big metal utility covering lid thing. Also, please wear eye protection.

I’d LOVE for folks to sign up on the Google calendar for short shifts on-site so folks who do long stints can go offsite to shower and whatnot. It really helps folks plan for that (rides etc.) if they know there will be coverage. Thanks to Bernie for signing up! [Contact Joe Cusumano to sign up for a shift – jpcusumano@gmail.com]

It is just so tragic that Penn State, all that it is and claims to be, would do this. In the face of this tidal wave of support.

When folks are by the road with signs and waving, almost every car that goes by waves and thumbs up or beeps.

The overwhelmingly positive community response to this action makes crystal clear what the position of the community is. Right behind us.

In Solidarity,

Laura

PS – Please help me remember something: I need to make a Facebook “check-in” while I’m on-site. If you see me there, please remind me to do that! I keep forgetting.

Supply Needs:

  • Snacks: Dave S. requested some dried fruits (cranberries sp.)
  • Bananas- just a few at a time please
  • Hand Wipes
  • Three dish bins for a dishwashing station.
  • We got the big storage containers!! We don’t need any more now. (Though we may in the future.)
  • We do NOT need more trash bags.

Reminders….

Please use your contacts to reach out to property owners in very visible locations to display No Toll signs.

If you haven’t yet, please sign the new petition, Demand that Penn State Acts as a Responsible Steward to Our Community’s Water

Pass it on please!

Staying Informed and In Touch

Like and Follow us on Facebook:

Website:

Update from No-Toll-ville – Friday, June 16

Occupation Day 14.

It was a long night of pouring rain last night and camp felt the effects. Our screen house collapsed in a heap.

When I arrived on the scene I saw a team of 4-5 folks working on reassembling it and much to my surprise and delight, the frame is now standing. Further work is needed and Don and his team are on it. We already have finely cut bamboo joint braces and I look forward to seeing their creative strutural reinforcements emerge!

We may not canopy it until after Sunday’s predicted storm passes. Our site meterologist, Mark Huncik is predicting a doozey. We may have been flooded with rain, but we were also flooded with community support.

A famous local chef brought us 4 BIG PANS of delicious food. It is tucked safely away for the night in various fridges now.

Midday, Ariana brought snacks and stayed to enjoy some delicous food with us.

Gloriously, we had several hours of delightfully drying sun and visitors galore. Octogenarian Eileen came with her cane and we helped her to and fro. She stayed well over an hour. She was very dismayed at the plan to develop the farmland and apologized several times for “getting her fire up”. I thoroughly encouraged her to come back and get her fire up any time.

Patti stopped by twice, once before and once after her Toastmasters toast. The subject was our struggle! I invited her to join us tonight but she told me she was going to carry our message to the Greentree Neighborhood Association Annual Picnic/Meeting happening at the same time!

We had a great and delightfully dry meeting tonight while several folks held down the fort in the rain. Upon arriving back at camp, we were greeted with delicious rice and beans from Vishal and the State College Food Not Bombs folks.

Evening was (wet and) beautiful. The dropped-down canopies are perfect places to gather (but watch your head!).

This land is beautiful (Check out attached photo of the site – Thanks Sara V!).

Thanks again to Dave S. and Bruce for weathering the storm.

Check in on them in the morning if you can!

In Solidarity,

Laura

Reminders….

Please use your contacts to reach out to property owners in very visible locations to display No Toll signs.

If you haven’t yet, please sign the new petition, Demand that Penn State Acts as a Responsible Steward to Our Community’s Water

Pass it on please!

Staying Informed and In Touch

Like and Follow us on Facebook:

Website:

Bailiwick News Series:

  • 9.9.16 Bailiwick News – Part 1 of series on water and farmland protection in the Slab Cabin Run watershed: Centre County Court ruling against Ferguson Township student housing development; impacts on regional planning. See also: 4.1.15 – PSU, Boundary Violations & Civic Trauma
  • 9.16.16 Bailiwick News – Part 2 of series on water and farmland protection in the Slab Cabin Run watershed: introduction to municipal legislator discussions re: Whitehall Road Regional Park development.
  • 9.30.16 Bailiwick News – Part 3 of series on water and farmland protection in the Slab Cabin Run watershed: continued coverage of municipal discussions re: Whitehall Road Regional Park development.
  • 10.21.16 Bailiwick News – Part 4 of series on water and farmland protection in the Slab Cabin Run watershed: continued coverage of municipal discussions re: Whitehall Road Regional Park development.
  • 12.2.16 Bailiwick News – Part 5 of series on water and farmland protection in the Slab Cabin Run watershed: continued coverage of municipal discussions re: Whitehall Road Regional Park development.
  • 12.23.16 Bailiwick News – Part 6 of series on water and farmland protection in the Slab Cabin Run watershed: continued coverage of municipal discussions re: Whitehall Road Regional Park development.
  • 3.1.17 Bailiwick News – Part 7 of series on water and farmland protection in the Slab Cabin Run watershed: Whitehall Road Regional Park as case study in regional governance.
  • 3.9.17 Bailiwick News – Part 8 of series on water and farmland protection in the Slab Cabin Run watershed: COG General Forum-Fulton Bank loan extension history.
  • 3.24.17 Bailiwick News – Part 9 of series on water and farmland protection in the Slab Cabin Run watershed: committee-level design and funding discussions for Whitehall Road Regional Park.
  • 6.6.17 Bailiwick News – Part 10A of series on water and farmland protection in the Slab Cabin Run watershed: the battle for the ecological and political future of the Centre Region.
  • 6.13.17 Bailiwick News – Part 10B of series on water and farmland protection in the Slab Cabin Run watershed: the battle for the ecological and political future of the Centre Region.

Update from No-Toll-ville – Thursday, June 15

Occupation Day 13.

Wow! What a day!

The State College Borough Water Authority has stepped up to the plate at the community table and has unanimously motioned to direct staff to research the feasibility of dye trace testing to assess potential fractures, conduits to the wells, and the interconnectivity of surface and ground water.

That is something to celebrate.

All of you helped make that happen.

The Authority feels emboldened by our actions and the public’s reaction. Two years ago they expressed to me that they thought the public didn’t really care about source water. Now they know otherwise.

David Hughes got a shout-out from the Authority for reading all thousand and somesuch pages of report. His effort was evident in his well-informed presentation today. Nailed it.

Organizationally, things are coming together and we are prepping to lose some folks to vacation soon. Be sure to recruit folks to join you at camp. Invite them to visit you there and come back!

Joe created a private GoogleCalendar today. He will send step by step info about how to find it and make it show up on your phone too. We worked out the bugs tonight.

Thanks to Lori Bedell, there is now a paper copy of the current petition at camp. PLEASE ASK follks to sign it when they stop to visit!

Thanks to Mat, Don, Pam and Bill who rolled in to help batten down for the storm.

Thanks to Dave S. and Bruce for weathering the storm.

They would probably appreciate some hot coffee tomorrow morning!

🙂

In Solidarity,

Laura

Reminders….

We are in need of folks to bring ice each day.

Please use your contacts to reach out to property owners in very visible locations to display No Toll signs.

If you haven’t yet, please sign the new petition, Demand that Penn State Acts as a Responsible Steward to Our Community’s Water

Pass it on please!

Staying Informed and In Touch

Like and Follow us on Facebook:

Website:

Bailiwick News Series:

  • 9.9.16 Bailiwick News – Part 1 of series on water and farmland protection in the Slab Cabin Run watershed: Centre County Court ruling against Ferguson Township student housing development; impacts on regional planning. See also: 4.1.15 – PSU, Boundary Violations & Civic Trauma
  • 9.16.16 Bailiwick News – Part 2 of series on water and farmland protection in the Slab Cabin Run watershed: introduction to municipal legislator discussions re: Whitehall Road Regional Park development.
  • 9.30.16 Bailiwick News – Part 3 of series on water and farmland protection in the Slab Cabin Run watershed: continued coverage of municipal discussions re: Whitehall Road Regional Park development.
  • 10.21.16 Bailiwick News – Part 4 of series on water and farmland protection in the Slab Cabin Run watershed: continued coverage of municipal discussions re: Whitehall Road Regional Park development.
  • 12.2.16 Bailiwick News – Part 5 of series on water and farmland protection in the Slab Cabin Run watershed: continued coverage of municipal discussions re: Whitehall Road Regional Park development.
  • 12.23.16 Bailiwick News – Part 6 of series on water and farmland protection in the Slab Cabin Run watershed: continued coverage of municipal discussions re: Whitehall Road Regional Park development.
  • 3.1.17 Bailiwick News – Part 7 of series on water and farmland protection in the Slab Cabin Run watershed: Whitehall Road Regional Park as case study in regional governance.
  • 3.9.17 Bailiwick News – Part 8 of series on water and farmland protection in the Slab Cabin Run watershed: COG General Forum-Fulton Bank loan extension history.
  • 3.24.17 Bailiwick News – Part 9 of series on water and farmland protection in the Slab Cabin Run watershed: committee-level design and funding discussions for Whitehall Road Regional Park.
  • 6.6.17 Bailiwick News – Part 10A of series on water and farmland protection in the Slab Cabin Run watershed: the battle for the ecological and political future of the Centre Region.
  • 6.13.17 Bailiwick News – Part 10B of series on water and farmland protection in the Slab Cabin Run watershed: the battle for the ecological and political future of the Centre Region.

 

Update from No-Toll-ville – Wednesday, June 14, 2017

Hi All!

It is Day 12 of the occupation and all is well in No Toll Ville.

A great Letter to the Editor appeared in the Centre Daily Times today!

Read it here.

Our organizational and communication structures are taking shape, so hang in there. Google calendar forthcoming.

We are in need of folks to bring ice each day.

If you haven’t, please sign the new petition, Demand that Penn State Acts as a Responsible Steward to Our Community’s Water

Please use your contacts to reach out to property owners in very visible locations to display No Toll signs. Does anyone know the folks that own The Barn in Lemont? If so, please ask them to host a sign.

In Solidarity,

Laura

Staying Informed and In Touch

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Bailiwick News Series: The battle for the Slab Cabin Run watershed and the political and ecological future of the Centre Region

  • 9.9.16 Bailiwick News – Part 1 of series on water and farmland protection in the Slab Cabin Run watershed: Centre County Court ruling against Ferguson Township student housing development; impacts on regional planning. See also: 4.1.15 – PSU, Boundary Violations & Civic Trauma
  • 9.16.16 Bailiwick News – Part 2 of series on water and farmland protection in the Slab Cabin Run watershed: introduction to municipal legislator discussions re: Whitehall Road Regional Park development.
  • 9.30.16 Bailiwick News – Part 3 of series on water and farmland protection in the Slab Cabin Run watershed: continued coverage of municipal discussions re: Whitehall Road Regional Park development.
  • 10.21.16 Bailiwick News – Part 4 of series on water and farmland protection in the Slab Cabin Run watershed: continued coverage of municipal discussions re: Whitehall Road Regional Park development.
  • 12.2.16 Bailiwick News – Part 5 of series on water and farmland protection in the Slab Cabin Run watershed: continued coverage of municipal discussions re: Whitehall Road Regional Park development.
  • 12.23.16 Bailiwick News – Part 6 of series on water and farmland protection in the Slab Cabin Run watershed: continued coverage of municipal discussions re: Whitehall Road Regional Park development.
  • 3.1.17 Bailiwick News – Part 7 of series on water and farmland protection in the Slab Cabin Run watershed: Whitehall Road Regional Park as case study in regional governance.
  • 3.9.17 Bailiwick News – Part 8 of series on water and farmland protection in the Slab Cabin Run watershed: COG General Forum-Fulton Bank loan extension history.
  • 3.24.17 Bailiwick News – Part 9 of series on water and farmland protection in the Slab Cabin Run watershed: committee-level design and funding discussions for Whitehall Road Regional Park.
  • 6.6.17 Bailiwick News – Part 10A of series on water and farmland protection in the Slab Cabin Run watershed: the battle for the ecological and political future of the Centre Region.
  • 6.13.17 Bailiwick News – Part 10B of series on water and farmland protection in the Slab Cabin Run watershed: the battle for the ecological and political future of the Centre Region.